Construction Projects

Click on a link below to see a slideshow with information on the project. (IE users: click the left and right sides of the slides to move through the slideshows)

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

$1.1 million

2008

FE&C personnel suited in personal protective equipment (PPE) and fall protection equipment.

FE&C’s job was to replace and repair the ten roof sections of the B Reactor. The work was categorized as very high risk due to radiological and asbestos hazards, as well as working at extreme heights during the high heat season.

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

$1.1 million

2008

FE&C worker checks his fall protection equipment.

Today, this reactor is registered as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service and dozens of tours each year are given through the reactor to the general public and special groups. The long-term goal for this facility is to have it transformed into a museum to educate future generations the significance and lessons learned from Hanford and the Manhattan Project.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

D reactor before coccooning operations began.

FE&C performed the disassembly, demolition and safe storage enclosure of the Hanford D Reactor, one of nine surplus plutonium production reactors located on the Hanford Site. Safe Storage Enclosure (SSE) is a process to protect remaining reactor components after decommissioning and decontamination and keep the area safe from leaking radiation for a 75-year period, giving the government time to decide how to dispose of the highly radioactive reactor core. This process is also referred to as “cocooning” the reactor. When a reactor is cocooned, about 80% of the buildings and auxiliary structures which were needed to support the reactor during its operating days are demolished and removed. The remaining 20% of the reactor complex, including the core of the reactor itself, is enclosed in a cement and steel, airtight and watertight structure.

D reactor was a weapons materials production nuclear reactor and was permanently shut down in 1967. Since that time, D reactor had been in a condition of minimum surveillance and maintenance. Several areas of the facility were in an advanced state of deterioration, particularly the roof structures.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Demolition phase.

FE&C was responsible for removing contaminated equipment, steel and concrete from the reactor building and managing more than 15,000 tons of waste. Contaminates were remediated, including low-level radioactive materials, asbestos, lead, PCBs, and other heavy materials. The upper structure was demolished to make way for the new cocoon.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Wrench motors for control rods.

Specific reactor equipment needed to be removed before the safe storage enclosure was constructed.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Careful demolition of the block walls inside the reactor.

FE&C both designed and constructed a new 75 year safe storage enclosure over the reactor including constructing a curtain wall over the external lead-plate shield wall. Electrical and control monitoring systems and ventilation equipment were installed as part of this process. FE&C sealed the reactor building openings by means of concrete pourbacks and steel plate covers to seal the doors and tunnel-size openings.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Construction of steel. Project risk management included large cranes and extreme heights.

200-ton cranes and other equipment were used to rig and hoist large internal components. Significant amounts of this work were performed high above ground, complicating project risk management. Other project challenges included an aggressive schedule and high-to-moderate radioactive concerns.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

The near-completed safe storage enclosure, or cocoon, around the 105D reactor.

Construction management of the enclosure project included procurements, transportation, testing and acceptance inspection support services. Nuclear and hazardous management were an integral part of all aspects of job performance which was completed on schedule with no lost time or radiological incidents.

USACE Seattle District - Corrosion Control Facility Upgrades, McChord AFB

USACE Seattle District - Corrosion Control Facility Upgrades, McChord AFB

$872,689

2008-2009

Aircraft inside corrosion control facility. Photo courtesy McChord Air Museum.

McChord Air Force Base is part of a joint base within the Army’s Lewis-McChord complex, located near Tacoma, Washington. It plays a part in mobilizing USAF aircraft globally for both military and humanitarian aid. The Corrosion Control Facility is a 46,823 square foot hangar for preventative maintenance for large C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. The facility’s high-capacity ventilation system, used during aircraft painting and coating operations, was functioning improperly. FE&C carried out repairs to this system in order to support the mission in keeping critical aircraft in shape for rapid response.

USACE Seattle District - Corrosion Control Facility Upgrades, McChord AFB

USACE Seattle District - Corrosion Control Facility Upgrades, McChord AFB

$872,689

2008-2009

Mechanic inside corrosion control facility.

FE&C and ELR Consulting were responsible for resolving operational and maintenance problems of the HVAC system due to installation deficiencies. To resolve the problems, FE&C conducted mechanical and electrical repairs to six existing make-up air units including:
  • Replacement of steam heating coils
  • Replacement of face and bypass dampers
  • Installation of a drain pan and drain line
  • Replacement of face and bypass dampers

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

Syncrude’s tower, before demolition.

The Athabasca oil sands are large deposits of bitumen, or extremely heavy crude oil, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada – roughly centered around the boomtown of Fort McMurray. These oil sands are being mined for an alternative to liquid petroleum.

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

The same tower, during demolition.

The sands consist of a mixture of crude bitumen, silica sand, clay minerals, and water. They are the largest reservoir of crude bitumen in the world. Together, these oil sand deposits contain about 1.7 trillion barrels of bitumen-in-place, comparable to the world’s total proven reserves of conventional petroleum.

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

Crumpled staircases during demolition, looking a lot like an MC Esher optical illusion.

Syncrude Canada contracted with FE&C for demolition services. FE&C completed demolition of Inbit Tower 24 and Aurora Bitman Tower, performing loadout and processing of 2,000 tons of steel and 1,500 tons of concrete, and size-reduced large tanks. Materials were then sorted and readied for salvage use.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

The 1.9 million square feet of Golden Giant Mine, before FE&C completely demolished the facility.

The Golden Giant Mine was a gold mine in the Hemlo mining camp in Ontario, Canada. Three prospectors discovered gold there in the early 1980s, starting a gold rush not seen in Canada since the Klondike gold rush of the late 19th century. With its first pour in April of 1985, Golden Giant was the first mine in the camp to ship. During its 21-year life, the mine produced over 6 million ounces of gold. The mine ceased operation in 2005 and closed permanently in 2006.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Siding is carefully dismantled with the use of man-lifts and cranes.

FE&C completed the Golden Giant Mine dismantlement and demolition project, dismantling 1.9 million square feet of facilities including removal of 250 ton crushers, ball mills, chutes, 110’ high conveyors, and 500 hp motors.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Very large cranes were used on this project.

Dismantling and demolition of the mine site facilities was undertaken to reclaim valuable equipment for re-use at other sites by the current owner and includes certain buildings, grinding mills, the crushing plant, flotation cells, compressors, boilers, generators, conveyors, pumps, motors, overhead cranes, transformers, assay laboratory, electrical switch gear and other equipment. 

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Demolition used very large equipment.

Work included demolishing 83 structures via shear and large excavator. Furthermore, FE&C performed loadout and size reducing 17,000 tons of steel and 14,000 tons of concrete including large monolithic blocks.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Immediately after the use of explosive demolition.

Explosive demolition was utilized for two parts of the project: to demolish the head frame, a 176 foot tall structure, and the 90 foot tall, two million gallon fine or bin.

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

$39,243,796

2002 - 2016

The KW Annex is a Category 2 Nuclear Facility that processes spent nuclear fuel sludge

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is a 586 square mile complex that is remediating legacy wastes from a 50 year history of weapons production. Remediation of this work is complex and ongoing, and new construction of multiple facilities has been necessary to support the effort. Construction work at Hanford often involves evolving site and project factors including potentially unknown site conditions and changing scope.

FE&C has constructed several new buildings on the complex to support training, testing, laboratory work, pretreatment, waste and sludge treatment, groundwater remediation, and control room operations. Various facilities have included typical construction work as well as projects requiring enhanced quality assurance and/or safety-significant challenges, such as Category 2 Nuclear Facilities. All projects were completed with no labor grievances, no missed regulatory milestones, and keeping FE&C’s excellent safety record.

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

$39,243,796

2002 - 2016

The PEP is a 1/4-scale pilot plant of the pretreatment system for Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant.

Facilities have included work on:
  • Pre-engineered metal buildings
  • Pre-fabricated test modules
  • Category 2 nuclear facilities
  • Simulated control rooms
  • Offices
  • Training facilities
  • Storage areas
  • Simulated process equipment
  • Complex mechanical systems
  • Intricate electrical systems
  • Concrete and paving systems
  • Landscaping

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - New Facility Construction at the Hanford Site

$39,243,796

2002 - 2016

Various projects have involved:
  • Demolition
  • Excavation
  • Site preparation
  • Engineering
  • Design
  • Fabrication
  • Civil
  • Structural
  • Mechanical
  • Electrical
  • Permitting
  • Construction
  • Subcontrator management
  • Installation
  • Reinstallation
  • Testing
  • QA documentation
  • Turnover to client

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

$11 Million

2012-2013

More than 2300 tons of irradiated uranium fuel was once stored in the K Basins, located 400 feet from the Columbia River.

In the 1980s, when the decision was made to stop producing plutonium at Hanford, there were more than 10,000 radioactive uranium fuel rods and rod fragments from the reactors that would not be processed any further and needed to be stored until a longer-term storage solution could be devised. It was determined these fuel rods would be temporarily placed in two water filled storage areas adjacent to the K-East and K-West Reactors. Called the K-Basins, these massive underground vessels were originally built in the 1950’s as holding tanks for uranium fuel rods during Hanford’s production days. At the time, they were built for a 20 year mission, but out of necessity, their life had to be extended for this new use.

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

$11 Million

2012-2013

Uncapped fuel stored underwater in K East Basin, before it was removed. This fuel left behind sludge that now needs remediation.

By the 1990’s, it was discovered the K-East basin was starting to leak contamination into the ground. Because they were located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, cleanup of the K-Basins became a high priority. The irradiated fuel rods were removed and transported to Hanford’s Container Storage Building. However, because the fuel rods had started to deteriorate, a material called “sludge” – a radioactive mixture of tiny fuel corrosion particles, fuel rod fragments, metal fragments and other materials – had formed in the water that remained in the basins. The K East sludge was transferred to the K West Basin and stored underwater with the K West Basin sludge, while the K East basin was then remediated and demolished.

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

$11 Million

2012-2013

Metal canisters holding plutonium and uranium sludge sit underwater in Hanford's K West basin, awaiting removal.

The KW Annex being constructed by FE&C is the main facility for the high-profile Sludge Treatment Project, will serve as a load out facility for the sludge stored in steel containers sitting underwater on the floor of the K-West Basin. The sludge will be suspended in water and pumped to the KW Annex and will be settled into tanks sitting on trailers ready to take them to the T-Plant for treatment and processing of the sludge waste and eventually readied for eventual long-term disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico.

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - K West Annex (Category 2 Nuclear Facility)

$11 Million

2012-2013

Sludge sampling.

The KW Annex is a Category 2 Nuclear Facility. A Category 2 Nuclear Facility is a facility that is defined as “having the potential for nuclear criticality events or with sufficient quantities of hazardous material and energy, which would require on-site emergency planning activities.” This requires utilizing an NQA-1 program, a specialized quality and safety protocol that deals specifically in nuclear facilities. FE&C is one of only a handful of construction companies having an existing and fully implemented 2008 NQA-1 program.

USACE Kansas City District - MATOC for Facilities Upgrades (with RELYANT Global)

USACE Kansas City District - MATOC for Facilities Upgrades (with RELYANT Global)

Up to $95 Million

2017-2020

FE&C and RELYANT will be performing multiple projects for USACE under a MATOC award.

FE&C is a teaming partner to RELYANT Global, a Service-Disabled Veteran Owned 8(a) Small Business, and the team has been awarded a three-year Multiple Award Task Order Contract (MATOC) for design-build and design-bid build construction projects for USACE. This contract is for the USACE's Kansas City District, with possible work throughout the greater Northwestern Division.

USACE Kansas City District - MATOC for Facilities Upgrades (with RELYANT Global)

USACE Kansas City District - MATOC for Facilities Upgrades (with RELYANT Global)

Up to $95 Million

2017-2020

Construction is for the Kansas City district, with possible projects throughout the greater Northwestern Division.

Notable facilities in the project scope include:

  • Fort Leanord Wood
  • Fort Leavenworth
  • Fort Riley
  • McConnell Air Force Base
  • Whiteman Air Force Base

Project scope is expected to include but is not limited to:

  • Facility improvements for headquarter buildings and dormitories
  • Historical renovations
  • New construction of storage facilities and office buildings
  • Demolition

Washington Closure Hanford - Remediation Under 324 Building’s B-Cell

Washington Closure Hanford - Remediation Under 324 Building’s B-Cell

$6,386,474.00

2014-2015

Highly radioactive b-cell as it exists today, as photographed remotely.

Hanford's 324 Building, a Category 2 Nuclear Facility, was built in 1965 as part of a large complex of facilities involved in radiological research. The B-cell, a 3-story room used by scientists for remote testing of radiological material, was once "so radioactive that an unprotected person inside..could have received a fatal dose in less than 2 seconds."

Much of the radiation in the cell was remediated by 2010, but at that time, a leak in the floor was discovered. It was found that very high levels of Cesium 137 and Strontium 90 had escaped into the soil beneath the building. This leak was radioactive enough that workers in protective clothing would not be able to come near the soil. Work was stopped, and it was time to make a new plan for remote excavation.

Washington Closure Hanford - Remediation Under 324 Building’s B-Cell

Washington Closure Hanford - Remediation Under 324 Building’s B-Cell

$6,386,474.00

2014-2015

b-cell remediation plan design.

As a subcontractor to AREVA, FE&C was responsible for the constructabitlity review to assess if the engineering plan would work. This project involved building two structures:

  1. Mockup Facility. The mockup facility is a full-scale working model of the B-Cell and the airlock in the 324 building. This facility is now being used to demonstrate means, methods, and equipment qualification for removal operations. FE&C installed the remote equipment, lighting, cameras, and manipulator arms within the 324 B cell as well as in the mockup facility.
  2. Wall and Floor. A full-scale wall and floor is being used to test some of the remotely-operated equipment. Specifically, operations have involved testing the sending of robotic tools remotely through the facility's walls.

URS/CH2M Hill Oak Ridge (UCOR) - Roof Resurfacing, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

URS/CH2M Hill Oak Ridge (UCOR) - Roof Resurfacing, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

2011-2012

The MRSE is an experimental molten-salt nuclear reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that ran from 1964-1969.

FE&C Eastern Operations is working on behalf of UCOR to cost-effectively repair and stabilize multiple roof surfaces at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), a Category 2 nuclear facility, and two other Category 2 facilities at ORNL. Eleven total roof structures will be resurfaced, roughly 25,000 square feet. The buildings are operable and occupied during the project.

The project team combines the extensive experience base, excellent safety records and successful teaming partnership of FE&C and Dodge Foam. The FE&C project team, lead by Andrew Powers, PE, is working to safely remove the existing layers of roofing materials, including gravel and debris. The team will safely install a waterproof membrane roof coating system (silicon) to the manufacturer's 10 year warranty installation specifications.

Three Rivers Real Estate - Three Rivers Office Facility

Three Rivers Real Estate - Three Rivers Office Facility

$3.5 million

2008-2009

The Three Rivers Building's expansive windows and decks take advantage of its location on the Columbia River.

This turnkey project included design, engineering, procurement and construction of a three level office building located in North Richland on 1.5 acres along the Columbia River. The state-of-the-art office building is a 20,607 square feet metal, glass and stone building with executive offices, conference rooms, restrooms, storage areas, kitchen facilities, multi-purpose rooms, IT and telephone communications and other enhanced user-friendly features. Included in the project scope were site preparation, permitting, civil-structural, electrical, mechanical, HVAC, parking, lighting and landscaping.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

$18,895,780

2002 - present

Historic photo of construction of Hanford Tanks. There are 177 tanks holding 56 million gallons of legacwaste at the tank farms.

In the middle of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is the most challenging and high-profile component – the Hanford Tank Farms. This complex of 177 underground tanks hold 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste from a legacy of 50 years of nuclear weapons production. Many of the tanks are reaching the end of their useful life, and several have leaked into the ground. Upgrades and modifications are necessary to support the upcoming waste feed delivery system to the vitrification (VIT) plant currently under construction.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

$18,895,780

2002 - present

One of the Hanford tank farms today.

FE&C has been completing required upgrades and modifications on supporting facilities such as laboratories and offices, as well as the tanks and tank farms themselves. Upgrades and modifications ranged from more typical construction to those needing more enhanced safety and quality assurance protocols due to chemical or radiological hazards, nuclear-grade construction, or complexity of the task. Most work was performed in high radiation or contamination areas or their buffer areas. All work performed by FE&C resulted in no missed regulatory milestones, and kept FE&C’s excellent safety record intact.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

$18,895,780

2002 - present

Many facility upgrades were completed at the 222S laboratory complex, including roofing, HVAC, lighting, and elevators.

Various projects have involved:
  • Demolition
  • Dismantling and relocation
  • Site preparation
  • Remediation of structures
  • Procurement
  • Fabrication
  • Installation
  • Inspections
  • Final acceptance
  • Operational testing
  • Recommissioning

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

Hanford Prime Contractors - Modifications and Upgrades to Hanford Tank Farms

$18,895,780

2002 - present

Construction scope included:
  • Above-ground tanks
  • Caissons
  • Coatings
  • Concrete pads
  • Condensors
  • Control cabinets
  • Control rooms
  • Detection systems
  • Ductwork
  • Equipment racks
  • Elevators and staircases
  • Exhausters
  • Fans
  • Fire protection systems
  • Hazardous Storage
  • HVAC systems
  • Instruments
  • Jumpers
  • Leak detection systems
  • Lighting systems
  • Monitoring systems
  • Piping
  • Platorms
  • Processing equipment
  • Pumps
  • Probes
  • Roads
  • Robotic Vehicles
  • Roof replacement
  • Safety Showers
  • Sensors
  • Sewage and plumbing
  • Sluicers
  • Stabilization of pipelines
  • Stormwater control
  • Switchgear cabinets
  • Tank risers
  • Transformers
  • Underground storage tanks
  • Ventilation systems
  • Warning systems
  • Wireless systems