Environmental Projects

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Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

$1.1 million

2008

FE&C personnel suited in personal protective equipment (PPE) and fall protection equipment.

FE&C’s job was to replace and repair the ten roof sections of the B Reactor. The work was categorized as very high risk due to radiological and asbestos hazards, as well as working at extreme heights during the high heat season.

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

Washington Closure Hanford - 100 B Reactor Roof Repair and Replacement

$1.1 million

2008

FE&C worker checks his fall protection equipment.

Today, this reactor is registered as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service and dozens of tours each year are given through the reactor to the general public and special groups. The long-term goal for this facility is to have it transformed into a museum to educate future generations the significance and lessons learned from Hanford and the Manhattan Project.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

D reactor before coccooning operations began.

FE&C performed the disassembly, demolition and safe storage enclosure of the Hanford D Reactor, one of nine surplus plutonium production reactors located on the Hanford Site. Safe Storage Enclosure (SSE) is a process to protect remaining reactor components after decommissioning and decontamination and keep the area safe from leaking radiation for a 75-year period, giving the government time to decide how to dispose of the highly radioactive reactor core. This process is also referred to as “cocooning” the reactor. When a reactor is cocooned, about 80% of the buildings and auxiliary structures which were needed to support the reactor during its operating days are demolished and removed. The remaining 20% of the reactor complex, including the core of the reactor itself, is enclosed in a cement and steel, airtight and watertight structure.

D reactor was a weapons materials production nuclear reactor and was permanently shut down in 1967. Since that time, D reactor had been in a condition of minimum surveillance and maintenance. Several areas of the facility were in an advanced state of deterioration, particularly the roof structures.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Demolition phase.

FE&C was responsible for removing contaminated equipment, steel and concrete from the reactor building and managing more than 15,000 tons of waste. Contaminates were remediated, including low-level radioactive materials, asbestos, lead, PCBs, and other heavy materials. The upper structure was demolished to make way for the new cocoon.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Wrench motors for control rods.

Specific reactor equipment needed to be removed before the safe storage enclosure was constructed.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Careful demolition of the block walls inside the reactor.

FE&C both designed and constructed a new 75 year safe storage enclosure over the reactor including constructing a curtain wall over the external lead-plate shield wall. Electrical and control monitoring systems and ventilation equipment were installed as part of this process. FE&C sealed the reactor building openings by means of concrete pourbacks and steel plate covers to seal the doors and tunnel-size openings.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

Construction of steel. Project risk management included large cranes and extreme heights.

200-ton cranes and other equipment were used to rig and hoist large internal components. Significant amounts of this work were performed high above ground, complicating project risk management. Other project challenges included an aggressive schedule and high-to-moderate radioactive concerns.

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

Bechtel - 105D Reactor Safe Storage Enclosure

$2.4 million

2003-2004

The near-completed safe storage enclosure, or cocoon, around the 105D reactor.

Construction management of the enclosure project included procurements, transportation, testing and acceptance inspection support services. Nuclear and hazardous management were an integral part of all aspects of job performance which was completed on schedule with no lost time or radiological incidents.

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

Syncrude’s tower, before demolition.

The Athabasca oil sands are large deposits of bitumen, or extremely heavy crude oil, located in northeastern Alberta, Canada – roughly centered around the boomtown of Fort McMurray. These oil sands are being mined for an alternative to liquid petroleum.

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

The same tower, during demolition.

The sands consist of a mixture of crude bitumen, silica sand, clay minerals, and water. They are the largest reservoir of crude bitumen in the world. Together, these oil sand deposits contain about 1.7 trillion barrels of bitumen-in-place, comparable to the world’s total proven reserves of conventional petroleum.

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

Syncrude Canada - Ft. McMurray, Alberta Demolition and Salvage

$1.5 million

2008

Crumpled staircases during demolition, looking a lot like an MC Esher optical illusion.

Syncrude Canada contracted with FE&C for demolition services. FE&C completed demolition of Inbit Tower 24 and Aurora Bitman Tower, performing loadout and processing of 2,000 tons of steel and 1,500 tons of concrete, and size-reduced large tanks. Materials were then sorted and readied for salvage use.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

The 1.9 million square feet of Golden Giant Mine, before FE&C completely demolished the facility.

The Golden Giant Mine was a gold mine in the Hemlo mining camp in Ontario, Canada. Three prospectors discovered gold there in the early 1980s, starting a gold rush not seen in Canada since the Klondike gold rush of the late 19th century. With its first pour in April of 1985, Golden Giant was the first mine in the camp to ship. During its 21-year life, the mine produced over 6 million ounces of gold. The mine ceased operation in 2005 and closed permanently in 2006.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Siding is carefully dismantled with the use of man-lifts and cranes.

FE&C completed the Golden Giant Mine dismantlement and demolition project, dismantling 1.9 million square feet of facilities including removal of 250 ton crushers, ball mills, chutes, 110’ high conveyors, and 500 hp motors.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Very large cranes were used on this project.

Dismantling and demolition of the mine site facilities was undertaken to reclaim valuable equipment for re-use at other sites by the current owner and includes certain buildings, grinding mills, the crushing plant, flotation cells, compressors, boilers, generators, conveyors, pumps, motors, overhead cranes, transformers, assay laboratory, electrical switch gear and other equipment. 

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Demolition used very large equipment.

Work included demolishing 83 structures via shear and large excavator. Furthermore, FE&C performed loadout and size reducing 17,000 tons of steel and 14,000 tons of concrete including large monolithic blocks.

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

Fortune Minerals - Golden Giant Mine Decommissioning and Demolition

$19 million

2008-2009

Immediately after the use of explosive demolition.

Explosive demolition was utilized for two parts of the project: to demolish the head frame, a 176 foot tall structure, and the 90 foot tall, two million gallon fine or bin.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Over $140 Million

2002 - 2017

Map showing location of most of Hanford's burial waste. FE&C has remediated over a third of Hanford's burial grounds.

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is a 586 square mile complex containing legacy wastes in various forms from a 50-year history of weapons production. Throughout the site, there were 592 waste sites consisting of burial grounds, trenches, cribs, burn pits, landfills, and other sites containing chemical and radioactive solid and liquid waste and remnants of auxiliary structures.

Over a 15-year history, FE&C has remediated over 220 of these waste sites, accounting for over a third of the number of Hanford's burial grounds.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Over $140 Million

2002 - 2017

Just one of the 220 burial ground sites that FE&C has remediated in its fifteen years on the job.

During the remediation of these 220 waste sites, FE&C has completed well over:
  • 3 million BCM (bank cubic meters) of excavation
  • 3 million BCM of loadout
  • 6 million BCM of backfill
  • 50,000 linear feet of pipeline, up to 108 inches in diameter
  • Chasing plumes of liquid waste to a depth of up to 85 feet, to groundwater level
Much of the word was completed in level B personal protective equipment, sometimes with supplied air. Despite the hazards inherent in the work, FE&C kept its exceptional record of quality and safety intact at a .60 EMR, the lowest possible rating granted.

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Over $140 Million

2002 - 2017

During ground excavation, items discovered, unearthed and removed included:

  • Concrete structures
  • Laboratory equipment
  • Vaults
  • Fencing
  • Underground tanks
  • Exhaust stacks
  • Aluminum cladding
  • Structural steel
  • 55-gallon drums
  • Paint
  • Railroad ties
  • Vacuum pits
  • Leaching trenches
  • Contaminated structures
  • Metallic waste
  • Firing ranges
  • Acid-lead batteries
  • Silos
  • Cyclone separators
  • Process soils
  • Lithium-aluminum alloy

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Hanford Prime Contractors - Ground Remediation at the Hanford Site

Over $140 Million

2002 - 2017

Environmental contaminants encountered included:
  • Acids
  • Anomalous wastes
  • Aromatic hydrocarbons
  • Asbestos
  • Barium
  • BTEX
  • Beryllium
  • Biological waste
  • Boron
  • Cadmium
  • Carbon steel
  • Carbon tetrachloride
  • Cesium
  • Coal tar creosote
  • Cobalt
  • Graphite
  • Heavy metals
  • Heavy oil
  • Hexavalent chromium
  • Hydrocarbons
  • Lead
  • Mercury
  • Munitions and explosives
  • Nickel
  • Palladium
  • Pesticides
  • Petroleum products
  • Phenolics
  • Plutonium
  • PCBs
  • PAHs
  • Pyrophoric uranium
  • Silver
  • Sludge
  • Sodium
  • Sodium dichromate
  • Solvents
  • Spent nuclear fuel
  • Strontium
  • Tar
  • Tritium
  • Unexploded ordnance
  • Uranium

USACE Walla Walla District - Little Goose Dam Transformer Oil Disposal

USACE Walla Walla District - Little Goose Dam Transformer Oil Disposal

2016

Aerial photo of Little Goose Dam.

The Little Goose Dam is an 810-megawatt capacity “run of river” hydroelectric facility on a remote part of the Snake River in Washington State. This project involved collection, transportation, and disposal of 14,500 gallons of transformer oil. PCB content of the transformer oil was 3.44 parts per million, and had not been collected in over 10 years.

The contract involved the use of two tanker trucks to transport the oil to Portland, Oregon for recycling approximately 300 miles away. Workers were required to provide secondary containment during discharge and to have material ready in case of a spill. Security policies and procedures were complied with due to nearby sensitive information and restricted areas.

USACE Walla Walla District - Snake River Restoration (with EAS)

USACE Walla Walla District - Snake River Restoration (with EAS)

$3,900,000

2017

Rice bar area on the Snake River.

The USACE Walla Walla District manages habitat to mitigate the effects of hydroelectric activity to wildlife in the area. Habitats are also used for recreational activities such as hunting. The Central Ferry and Rice Bar Habitat Management Units are located on a remote section of the Snake River between Lower Granite and Little Goose Dams, and total 1043 acres. 40 of the acres had been infested with non-native plant species, which had discouraged native and migratory birds from utilizing the area.

Alaskan-Native corporation-owned small disadvantaged business 8(a) EAS was awarded a $3.9 million contract to revegetate the area with native plant species. To prepare the area for revegetation activities, site preparation including grading was subcontracted to FE&C.

USACE Walla Walla District - Snake River Restoration (with EAS)

USACE Walla Walla District - Snake River Restoration (with EAS)

$3,900,000

2017

Map of the 1043 acres of the two habitat management units requiring remediation.

FE&C provided all labor and equipment to grade select areas at the two habitat management units. Land was graded at depths up to 3' to satisfactorily mitigate invasive species, and then contoured to prepare for revegetation. The winter was unusually snowy and cold, with more than a foot of new snow occurring on some days. These extreme weather conditions escalated the challenges of the remote location, but FE&C performed all work without any injury or incident.